Professor Rashid Khalidi to visit Dearborn to discuss 'One Hundred Years' War on Palestine'

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Rashid Khalidi. - ALEX LEVAC
  • Alex Levac
  • Rashid Khalidi.
Last month, Rashid Khalidi, a professor of modern Arab studies at Columbia University and the world’s foremost academic authority on Palestinian history, identity, and nationalism, released his seventh book, The One Hundred Years’ War on Palestine: A History of Settler Colonialism and Resistance, 1917-2017.

The book’s release coincided with the announcement of a Middle East “peace plan,” supported by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, greenlit by President Donald Trump, and drafted by Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner, that would grant Israel full control of more than 30% of the West Bank. Khalidi described the plan to Democracy Now! as “yet another declaration of war on Palestinians.” For this free event, Professor Khalidi will discuss his latest book and the United States’ implicit role in the ongoing conflict in the Middle East.



(Note: this lecture will be delivered in English.)

Event begins at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 26, at the Arab American National Museum; 13624 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-582-2266; arabamericanmuseum.org. Event is free and open to the public.




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