Virtual discussion will go 'beyond the headlines' of Flint water crisis

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Seven years ago in April, state officials made the disastrous decision to switch Flint's water source to save a few million dollars — a costly mistake that resulted in the Flint water crisis, and the poisoning of tens of thousands of people.

While the state announced a historic $600 million settlement with Flint residents, the root causes of the crisis, like Michigan's emergency manager law, remain in place.



ProPublica will host a virtual panel on Thursday to discuss the ongoing crisis, as well as answer questions from viewers.

The panel will be moderated by ProPublica's Talia Buford, a Flint native. featured speakers include Jiquanda Johnson, founder and executive editor of Flint Beat; E. Yvonne Lewis, founder and CEO of the National Center for African American Health Consciousness; Benjamin Pauli, assistant professor of social science at Kettering University; and ProPublica reporter (and former MT contributor) Anna Clark, author of The Poisoned City: Flint’s Water and the American Urban Tragedy.



"The Flint Water Crisis: An Uncertain Aftermath and Future" will take place from 7-8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 25. Viewers can register online here.

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