NYT reporter and creator of the '1619 Project' Nikole Hannah-Jones to visit U-M to discuss its impact

By

comment
Nikole Hannah-Jones. - ASSOCIAÇÃO BRASILEIRA DE JORNALISMO INVESTIGATIVO/FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS
  • Associação Brasileira de Jornalismo Investigativo/Flickr Creative Commons
  • Nikole Hannah-Jones.

Since releasing the "1619 Project" into the world — a sprawling package of stories that posits that the true beginning of United States history starts when the first African slaves arrived in Virginia 400 years ago — Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones has sparked a profound dialogue on race and how we interact with history.



Named as one of Time Magazine’s 100 most influential people of 2021 (they describe the 45-year-old as “a journalist who catalyzes the debate over how a nation teaches its history”), Hannah-Jones will visit Ann Arbor’s Rackham Auditorium for a discussion on the impact of the "1619 Project" in conjunction with Ann Arbor District Library’s current exhibit, "An Exhibit of the 1619 Project,"which features some of project’s original articles, poems, short stories, and images.

Also coming up on Hannah-Jones radar, the MacArthur Genius will soon cross "children’s author" off her list of accomplishments. Born on the Water, which will be released on Nov. 16, borrows from the "1619 Project" and aims to reframe how Black children are taught their history. The lyrical picture book is the result of Hannah-Jones’ partnership with Newbery honor-winning writer Renée Watson.



Discussion begins at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, at the Rackham Auditorium, 915 E. Washington St., Ann Arbor; 734-668-8397; aadl.org. Tickets are $10.50 or $8.50 for students, seniors, and veterans. Event is free and open to the public. *A health screening must be completed before entry into U-M buildings.


Stay connected with Detroit Metro Times. Subscribe to our newsletters, and follow us on Google News, Apple News, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Reddit.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Detroit Metro Times. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Detroit Metro Times, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at letters@metrotimes.com.

Support Local Journalism.
Join the Detroit Metro Times Press Club

Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state. Our readers helped us continue this coverage in 2020, and we are so grateful for the support.

Help us keep this coverage going in 2021. Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing membership pledge, your support goes to local-based reporting from our small but mighty team.

Join the Metro Times Press Club for as little as $5 a month.